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The Matryoskha or Russian nesting doll is one of the most popular and endearing examples of Russian folk art.  These HULA DOLLS were created in  ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA by Matryoshka artists. 

Fashioned entirely of natural products, each doll was handpainted and, therefore, COMPLETELY UNIQUE.  Like the traditional Matryoshka Russian nesting dolls, these HULA DOLLS were created out of birch wood.

The HULA DOLLS are hollow and are used as bottle holders or for storing keepsakes. 
It takes a lot of time to make these dolls. The tree was cut in the spring, stripped of its bark leaving a few rings to prevent the wood from cracking when dried. The logs were dried and kept in the open for several years. They were then cut in smaller pieces. All the operations did not involve any measurement; they relied totally on intuition and required great skill. After the turning work on a lathe was done, the dolls were cleaned, primed with starchy glue to make their surface smooth, polished and ready for painting. After having been hand-painted, they were dried for several days before having the lacquer applied.  Six or seven coats were needed to give the doll the brilliant shine. 
 As shown from left to right:  1)Hula Girl with Pineapple Bowl  7"H, $25.00,  2)Hula Girl with Birds of Paradise Fan  7"H, $25.00,  

3)Hula Girl with Grasss Skirt 7"H, $25.00 SOLD

The Matryoskha or Russian nesting doll is one of the most popular and endearing examples of Russian folk art. These HULA DOLLS were created in ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA by Matryoshka artists.

Fashioned entirely of natural products, each doll was handpainted and, therefore, COMPLETELY UNIQUE. Like the traditional Matryoshka Russian nesting dolls, these HULA DOLLS were created out of birch wood.

The HULA DOLLS are hollow and are used as bottle holders or for storing keepsakes.
It takes a lot of time to make these dolls. The tree was cut in the spring, stripped of its bark leaving a few rings to prevent the wood from cracking when dried. The logs were dried and kept in the open for several years. They were then cut in smaller pieces. All the operations did not involve any measurement; they relied totally on intuition and required great skill. After the turning work on a lathe was done, the dolls were cleaned, primed with starchy glue to make their surface smooth, polished and ready for painting. After having been hand-painted, they were dried for several days before having the lacquer applied. Six or seven coats were needed to give the doll the brilliant shine.
As shown from left to right: 1)Hula Girl with Pineapple Bowl 7"H, $25.00, 2)Hula Girl with Birds of Paradise Fan 7"H, $25.00,

3)Hula Girl with Grasss Skirt 7"H, $25.00 SOLD


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